A Manifesto for Shadow Places to re-imagine and co-produce connections for justice in an era of climate change

Dr Fiona Miller1, Dr  Emily Potter2, Assoc Prof Eva Lövbrand3, Assoc Prof Donna Houston1, Dr Jessica McLean1, Dr Emily O’Gorman1, The . Shadow Places Network4

1Department Of Geography And Planning, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia,

2Literary Studies, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia,

3Department of Thematic Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden,

4various,  international

 

In this paper, on behalf of The Shadow Places Network, we outline a working manifesto of politics and practice. We mobilise the format of the manifesto to speak to an uncertain and damaged future, to begin to imagine other possible worlds. For feminist philosopher Val Plumwood, whose thinking inspires this network, shadow places are the underside of the capitalist fantasy, ‘the multiple disregarded places of economic and ecological support’ (2007, 139). In turning towards shadow places, and the unjust and unsustainable processes that produce them, we call for an environmental humanities – including a geography – that reaches beyond abstraction, fosters new responsibilities, considers the uncomfortable, and generates reparative possibilities and alternative futures. We aim to trace out a world of shadow places. We acknowledge that these shadow places cannot be known in full, but through a willingness to engage in careful conversation with the beings and places harmed by (or strategically shielded from) processes of the Anthropocene we can learn how to relate to each other and these places in more just ways. Recognising that shadow places are impermanent and contingent, this working manifesto does not look to predetermine or prescribe but rather invites conversation, encounter and exchange.


Biography:

Fiona Miller is a human geographer who undertakes research on the social dimensions of environmental change, with a particular focus on vulnerability to climate change, society-water relations, and climate-related displacement. She presents this paper on behalf of the Shadow Places Network.

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